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Tag Archives: Psychology

Time runs differently when you're vacationing in Paris. Sculpture at Gare St-Lazare, Paris. Photo © David McSpadden, via flickr and creative commons

Subjective time moves at its own pace

‘When I play Candy Land with my five-year-old, time creeps,” she says. “A game lasts only 10 minutes, but it feels like two hours to me.” My friend is describing her experience of subjective time. The clock in her phone steadily marks the minutes, no matter what she does. Yet Read more →

Photo © Rebecca Pollard, via flickr and Creative Commons

Addictiveness by design casts ethical shadow over game designers

Seven of Victoria’s video-game studios recently launched new games. The games, which include TinyMob’s Tiny Realms and GameHouse’s new version of Slingo, highlight the industry’s growth in the region. The 20 or so Victoria-based studios employ 240 people and spend about $25 million annually. Eight years ago, about 40 people Read more →

Single-serving bags of chips. Photo © m01229, via flickr and Creative Commons

High-tech tools provide insights into consumers’ brains

Nature Boy waved a bag of potato chips at me. “No, thanks. I’m not hungry,” I said. “But when you see this bag, how do you feel? Do you feel a twinge of guilt? Do you feel nostalgic?” “Actually, right now, I feel puzzled and exasperated….” Nature Boy’s household psychological Read more →

Playing on beach. Photo © Wynand Strydom, via creative commons and flickr

Play’s the thing for healthy, creative kids (and adults)

Summer calls. Many youngsters stand at the leading edge of the season and anticipate two months of endless days, sunshine, mucking around and running about. Two whole months of playing! However, many instead will endure a packed roster of prebooked, highly managed and directed activities. Many will take part in Read more →

Dogs are attuned to their people, but who is in charge. Photo © Stefan Holodnick, dailyinvention.com, via creative commons.

Dogs take a bow(-wow!) for canine cognition

Some dogs show more intelligence than most people. Or so their owners tell me. Perhaps thinking of one’s four-legged best friend as brighter than one’s children—perhaps not one’s children, but possibly one’s in-laws—goes with the territory of being a dog owner. Much like people universally describing their driving skills or Read more →

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